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Instead of my typical president’s letter, I’d like to reserve this space to honor the lives lost from the tragedy that occurred in Atlanta, Georgia on March 16, 2021 as well as other attacks against members of the Asian American community across the United States. When I read the victim’s names and who they have left behind, I feel saddened and angry. WWPR condemns these acts of violence and hate.

Christina Francisco, President WWPR

We take this moment to remember their lives and legacies left behind:

  • Forty-year-old Xiaojie Tan immigrated to the U.S. from China and went on to own two spas in Georgia. Her daughter said that Xiaojie worked every day, long hours, to give her family a better life.
  • Delaina Ashley Yaun Gonzalez was a newly married mother of two, a teenage son and baby daughter. Delaina was 33 years old.
  • Yong Ae Yue, who was 63, was described by family as kind-hearted. Her son wrote that Yong loved to introduce family and friends to her home-cooked Korean meals and karaoke.
  • Fifty-one-year-old Hyun Jung Grant was a single mother to her two sons. One son described Hyun as playful and a young spirit.
  • Detroit native Paul Andre Michels served in the Army before moving to Atlanta in 1995. The 54-year-old was a dedicated husband and brother, his family said.
  • Soon Chung Park moved to Atlanta to be closer to friends. She was said to be fit and active. Soon was 74 years old.
  • Suncha Kim, who was 69 years old, immigrated to the U.S. from South Korea. She was pure-hearted and selfless, her granddaughter said.
  • Daoyou Feng was described as kind and quiet and had recently started working at Young’s Asian Massage, according to reports. She was 44 years old.

Source: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/remembering-the-lives-lost-in-atlanta-shootings

Lastly, if you are looking for organizations and resources on this matter, here is a list care of The Conference on Asian Pacific American Leadership (CAPAL) enewsletter, a DC organization that seeks to empower Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) youth by increasing access to public service opportunities and building a strong AANHPI public service pipeline.
StopAAPIHate.org
Asian Americans Advancing Justice (AAJC) Atlanta
National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum (NAPAWF) Atlanta
Red Canary Song
GoFundMe for the families of the victims of the Atlanta area shootings
DC’s Chefs Stopping AAPI Hate